Grond's Tale

Welcome to your campaign!
A blog for your campaign

Wondering how to get started? Here are a few tips:

1. Invite your players

Invite them with either their email address or their Obsidian Portal username.

2. Edit your home page

Make a few changes to the home page and give people an idea of what your campaign is about. That will let people know you’re serious and not just playing with the system.

3. Choose a theme

If you want to set a specific mood for your campaign, we have several backgrounds to choose from. Accentuate it by creating a top banner image.

4. Create some NPCs

Characters form the core of every campaign, so take a few minutes to list out the major NPCs in your campaign.

A quick tip: The “+” icon in the top right of every section is how to add a new item, whether it’s a new character or adventure log post, or anything else.

5. Write your first Adventure Log post

The adventure log is where you list the sessions and adventures your party has been on, but for now, we suggest doing a very light “story so far” post. Just give a brief overview of what the party has done up to this point. After each future session, create a new post detailing that night’s adventures.

One final tip: Don’t stress about making your Obsidian Portal campaign look perfect. Instead, just make it work for you and your group. If everyone is having fun, then you’re using Obsidian Portal exactly as it was designed, even if your adventure log isn’t always up to date or your characters don’t all have portrait pictures.

That’s it! The rest is up to your and your players.

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First

I think these will be the best way to actually create the action. I’ll make a post, and you can reply to it, and then I’ll make another post, etc.

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#1. The Beginning
We all begin.

Time: June 14th, 3C 79. Afternoon.

Inside the library, the light comes in only as dusty slanted pillars through the open windows, which also let the summer in. The cicadas are a loud droning outside, which might make it hard to focus. It certainly seems to do so for Half-Orc twins Tharkul and Ankhalus, the other two students in the room. The three of you are in your semi-weekly Philosophy class, which never seems to interest the brothers.

They came to the monastery only recently, and despite their youth and race, they seem to find little kinship with you, Grond. They are a few years your junior and only really seem interested in their martial studies, spending their spare time sparring in the yard with Clara or each other. Ankhalus in particular has proven himself to be a skilled combatant with innate magic, able to make himself completely invisible for short periods of time. Currently, the boys are trying to write on one another’s parchment while Kjinja talks about the nature and existence of evil.

Kjinja is an elf whose life has eclipsed nearly four centuries. His ability to walk was lost a long time ago, so he floats on a small magical carpet, an extravagant item for such a poor monastery. Apparently he fasted for almost two years to help pay for it. His robes are simple cotton and black, the color hiding the sores on his body that leak and stain his clothes. His hands wobble constantly with tremors, and he raises them to eye level when he talks. His voice is very quiet, a problem exacerbated by the twin’s horseplay. In the year since their arrival at the hands of a desperate human mother, Kjinja has constant difficulty keeping them behaved, especially during warm months such as this, and often he just tries to talk over them.

In the defense of the twins, Kjinja definitely has a habit of being long-winded, and the sun kisses the stacks of tomes with a small radiance that looks the way sun-heated leather smells.

“In the case of the church that we talked about last week—Grond mentioned and we concluded that a vampire would not be allowed to enter a church of Pelor because the vampire is inherently evil. Boys, listen please. But what if the Pelorian priest is actually an evil man? What if the building were to have a wall fall in, or collapse completely? Boys. Does the good of Pelor come from the building, the land—boys—the people inside, or Pelor himself?”

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